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We recently came across an article on the best selling violin cases where we saw the best violin cases ranging between $150 to $1000, and we asked ourselves...what?

How can there be such a wide-range in price on the best-selling cases? If a $150 case is as good as a $1000 case, can we just get the $150 case and call it a day? Sure we can!

But we’d probably end up pretty disappointed and looking through the return policies.

Now we’re not suggesting everybody to go buy $1000 violin cases. But we want to make sure that we create an article about the best violin cases within different budgets. AND the pros and cons of each case.

Yes, a $1000 case is most likely better than a $150 case. BUT if your budget is $250, what is the best violin case you can get based on your needs.

 

For example, a $299 Bobelock violin case is as protective and durable as some $800 violin cases. But it’s also twice as heavy.

However, to a violinist who is more budget conscious, and doesn’t mind the extra 3-4 lb, a Bobelock violin case would be an ideal case for him.

This is why we have created a short list of the best selling violin cases based on 3 different budget categories.

But before we get to that list, let’s first dive into the qualities of a violin case that makes it a great violin case.

 

What Are The Qualities Of A Great Violin Case?

  1.  
  2. 1. Lightweight
  3. 2. Protective
  4. 3. Durable
  5. 4. Functional
  6. 5. Stylish

 

Lightweight

What is lightweight for a violin case? Any case under 5 lb. If it gets under 4.4 lb, that’s impressive.

Weight is probably the biggest factor when it comes to determining the price of a case. For many of the top case brands in the world, such as Bam violin cases or Gewa violin cases, the goal is to engineer the most durable and protective cases without sacrificing weight.

This is not easy! Which is why the engineering and manufacturing process of these lightweight cases can be pricey.

 

Protective

Great protection is a must. Why spend money on an un-protective case? Protection is determined by the type of material used, and the brand behind the case.

Did you know a $100 plywood violin case is often times more protective than a $150 fiberglass case? That’s because cheaper processes are used to keep the cost of a fiberglass case below $150.

A company can be using paper thin fiberglass and still call it a fiberglass violin case. Which is why the brand that ensures the quality of their fiberglass cases is a really important factor.

Check out our post on fiberglass violin cases to learn more.

 

Durable

A durable violin case can last you for decades, making it a worthy investment.

The biggest issue we see with durability is not the case, but all the small components that are on the case.

A great case with cheap plastic zippers will still need to be completely replaced if those zippers wear out within the first year.

Again, the brand determines the quality of workmanship and materials used to build the case.

 

Functional

This is where things get personal. Now every violinist obviously wants a light, durable, and protective case. But functionality can vary from one violinist to the next.

Here’s a list of some of the functionalities a case can have?

  1. 1. Spacious accessory pocket - often times for larger shoulder rests, tuners, cleaners, etc. You’ll usually find these with oblong violin cases.
  2.  
  3. 2. Zippered music pouches - some cases have full-zippered pouches on top of the case for sheet music. Some of the more modern cases have smaller sheet music pouches on the backside.
  4.  
  5. 3. Combination locks or key locks - Some cases feature number locks instead of key locks. This is good for musicians who want to lock up their cases and not have to worry about forgetting their keys.
  6.  
  7. 4. Hygrometers - You’ll generally find these with more traditional wooden cases. If the case doesn’t have a hygrometer, no worries. Digital hygrometers are fairly easy to find. Here’s an article that goes into further detail on violin case hygrometers.
  8.  
  9. 5. Zippers or clasps - You’ll generally find zippers on traditional wooden cases, and clasps on more modern cases.
  10.  
  11. 6. Removable accessory pouches - This feature has been growing in popularity. The pouch is usually secured to the case by velcro. Which means you can take the whole pouch out of your case and bring it with you to your music stand, keeping all your accessories in one place. This is very useful for orchestral musicians who do not want to run back and forth between their stand and their case for accessories.

 

Stylish

This is what makes a violin case stand out! Some violinists will prefer the look of a genuine leather violin case over the standard black canvas cases that can get lost in a sea of black cases.

Now that we understand the aspects of a great violin case, let’s dive into some of the reasons that people need a new violin case.

 

The Reasons Violinists Need A New Case

For Travel

this is one of the most common answers we get. Traveling musicians need a case that’ll meet airline regulations, and able to withstand the harsh temperature changes that can happen during travels.

Violinists generally go for slim contoured violin cases that don’t attract too much attention when it comes to boarding a plane. The last thing we want is to check-in our violin cases under the plane.

Check out our post on the top violin cases for travel.

 

Light & Easy On The Shoulders

Violin cases can get pretty heavy. And over time, they can really start weighing down on the shoulders.

This can be a problem for young students if they’re used to carrying heavy cases. This can put a lot of stress on one side of the body, causing issues with posture over time.

This is when violinists will prioritize weight over protection.

 

It's a Gift!

We actually sell quite a lot of cases during Christmas. Family members know how passionate their loved ones are for music.

A case is a great gift because it’s something that violinists will definitely love. It’s personal, it’s something that can be used everyday, and it’s usually a luxury that student violinists won’t think of getting for themselves.

People who buy cases as a gift generally go for something nicer, a little more stylish.

A case that’ll make the violinist go “wow” when they open the box.

Violin Case Gift

 

Old Case Is Falling Apart

And last but not least, sometimes a violinist needs a new case because their old one is simply falling apart.

For these violinists, we generally recommend thinking of everything that was wrong with the old case, and what you would want different in your new case.

Was the old case too heavy? Were the zippers too flimsy, and possibly the reason why you need a new case?

Or did you simply get a nicer violin that deserves a nicer case?

 

Finding Your Ideal Violin Case

Now that we understand the aspects of a great violin case and some of the top reasons for buying a new violin case, it’s time to consider your ideal violin case that will fit your budget and your needs.

At Great Violin Cases, whenever someone asks us to recommend a violin case for them, the first question we always ask is - what is your budget?

And this is how we have structured our list of top-selling cases.

 

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Best Selling Violin Cases Based On Budget

 

We have broken down our best violin cases into 3 budget categories:

  1. 1. Violin cases over $500
  2. 2. Violin cases between $250 - $500
  3. 3. Violin cases under $250

Keep in mind that we’re recommending the best violin case we can find within each budget category.

We’re not suggesting that a $250 case is as good as an $800 case simply because it sells more and has higher reviews.

In general, cheaper cases will sell more because there are more students than professionals.

The $250 case may be more suitable for the large majority of young students, but it will definitely not be ideal for a professional violinist traveling the world.

 

Best-Selling Violin Cases Over $500

Price: starting at $588, weight: 4.4 lb.

Pros

  • - Less than 4.5 lb. Very light for an oblong case. Easy to carry.
  • - Thermoplastic shells. This is Gewa’s success of engineering an extremely protective, durable, and lightweight case using more affordable materials compared to carbon fiber. Probably the best oblong violin case you will find under $600!
  • - Spacious. Can fit any size shoulder rest.
  • - Lots of colors to choose from.
  • - Attached sheet music pouch on the backside.
  • - Comes with 2 neoprene backpack straps. More comfort on the shoulders.
  • - More heat-resistant. Thermoplastic shells do not absorb heat like carbon fiber cases do.
  • - Gewa’s patented swivel bow holders. These bow holders are very durable. You don’t have to worry about your bow falling on your violin because of loose bow holders.

Cons

  • - Oblong cases in general aren’t as ideal for traveling musicians. Especially for musicians traveling on budget airlines with strict carry-on regulations. However, you can checkout the Gewa Air 1.7 contoured violin cases.
  • - No hygrometer. We also notice that almost all modern cases do not have hygrometers.
  • - No case covers. Which can be useful in really cold climates.

Price: starting at $576, weight: 3.5-3.9 lb.

Pros

  • - Less than 4 lb. Very light. Easy to carry.
  • - Comes with 2 neoprene backpack straps. More comfort on the shoulders.
  • - Compact. Great for traveling musicians.
  • - Lots of styles and colors to choose from.
  • - Hightech hard shells. Incredibly protective and durable. As protective as carbon fiber.
  • - More heat-resistant. Hightech shells do not absorb heat like carbon fiber cases do.
  • - Bam case cover options. A great addition for violinists in cold climates.
  • - Patented interior foam core. Basically a hard foam that serves as a suspension system. The suspension “suspends” your violin, so that the instrument doesn’t touch the case. If you dropped the case, the violin will not feel the impact.

Cons

  • - It’s compact. There’s no space for larger shoulder rests, such as a Bon Musica shoulder rest.
  • - No space for sheet music. This is true for almost all contoured violin cases.
  • - It’s not scratch-proof. These cases can still scratch. Which is why Bam came out with their polycarbonate scratch-resistant L’opera violin cases, and rubber-layered Bam Panther violin cases.

Price: starting at $796, weight: 6.4 lb.

Pros

  • - Beautiful traditional wooden violin case.
  • - The Negri brand is well known for its workmanship.
  • - Large zippered canvas sheet music pouch.
  • - Luxurious suede interiors.
  • - Wooden shells are great against inclement weather and humid weather.
  • - Large interior accessory pocket. Can fit large shoulder rests as well.
  • - Scratch-resistant exterior canvas.

Cons

  • - Not as light as the Gewa Air or Bam Hightech cases.
  • - Exterior color only comes in black.

 

Best-Selling Violin Cases Between $250 and $500

Price: starting at $299, weight: 8 lb.

Pros

  • - Beautiful traditional wooden violin case.
  • - As protective and durable as the $700 Negri wooden cases. Probably the most protective and durable oblong case you’ll find under $300.
  • - The Bobelock brand is well known for its durability.
  • - Large zippered canvas sheet music pouch.
  • - Luxurious velvet interiors.
  • - Wooden shells are great against inclement weather, and humid weather.
  • - Two large interior accessory pockets. Both can fit large shoulder rests.
  • - Protective suspension system. The suspension “suspends” your violin, so that the instrument doesn’t touch the case. If you dropped the case, the violin will not feel the impact.

Cons

  • - Heavy. Which is what makes the case more affordable.
  • - Exterior color only comes in black.
  • - Backpack straps aren’t really designed for comfort. We would suggest getting the Bobelock Comfort V-strap with the case.

Price: starting at $385, weight: 3.3 lb.

Pros

  • - Incredibly light! Only 3.3 lb.
  • - Made in Japan. Known for precise workmanship.
  • - Durable components. Such as the Rainproof zippers and Swiss lock.
  • - Deep sheet music pouch. Most contoured cases do not have zippered compartments for sheet music. However, this case has an extendable music pouch on top of the case that can still fit standard-size sheet music.
  • - Hard foam core construction makes the case good against inclement weather.

Cons

  • - No space for shoulder rest.
  • - Interior looks a little too simple.
  • - Accessory pouch is really small. Only enough space for rosin.

Price: starting at $269, weight: 5.6 lb.

Pros

  • - LOTS of colors to choose from
  • - Spacious pocket under the instrument for accessories and shoulder rest. This is quite rare for contoured violin cases.
  • - Velcro bow holders. Don’t have to worry about swivels coming loose over time.
  • - Sturdy fiberglass shells.
  • - Tonareli case covers available. Great against cold climates and also protects the case from scratches and spills.

Cons

  • - New-car smell. We have received comments that the case has a new-car smell when it is first opened. We suggest airing it out for 2-3 weeks before putting the instrument in.
  • - No space for sheet music. It does come with a sheet music pouch. But comments also suggest that this pouch works better for the Tonareli oblong fiberglass violin cases, instead of the shaped cases.
  • - Not as protective as the Bobelock fiberglass violin cases.

 

Best-Selling Violin Cases Under $250

 

Gewa Pure Violin Cases

Price: starting at $220, weight 4 - 5.3 lb.

Pros

  • - Most protective case under $300
  • - Scratch-resistant polycarbonate shells
  • - Adjustable neck support to fit 3/4 and 4/4 violins
  • - Gewa’s patented swivel bow holders. These bow holders are very durable. You don’t have to worry about your bow falling on your violin because of loose bow holders
  • - Removable accessory pouch
  • - Protective suspension system. The suspension “suspends” your violin, so that the instrument doesn’t touch the case. If you dropped the case, the violin will not feel the impact

Cons

  • - Some violinists will full-size violins don’t want an adjustable neck support.
  • - No velcro strap for shoulder rest in the contoured case.
  • - Only 4 colors available (at the time of writing this article).

 

Howard Core CC450 Oblong Violin Cases

Price: starting at $239, weight: 6 lb.

Pros

  • - Spacious. Can fit shoulder rests of any size.
  • - Large removable accessory pouch.
  • - Textured exterior shells, which makes scratches look less obvious.
  • - Combination lock to open the case.
  • - Padded sheet music pouch on the backside. Which allows for more comfort on the back when carrying the case like a backpack.

Cons

  • - Not as protective as the fiberglass cases.
  • - Even though the case is scratch-resistant, it still seems to scratch fairly easily. The lined texture does help the scratches look less obvious.

Price: starting at $229, weight: 5 lb.

Pros

  • - Backpack straps are attached to the case. This makes it easier to carry compared to other cases where you have to attach the backpack straps with D-rings.
  • - 3 Accessories compartments. 1 Large and 2 small.
  • - Reflective strips on the case. At night, car lights will reflect off the case, making it safer to carry at night.
  • - The exterior canvas is 100% waterproof. So it doesn’t soap up rain water.
  • - The structure of the case is designed to take a lot of pressure. You can stand on the case.

Cons

  • - The large accessory pocket is not as large as we hope. You have to stuff a shoulder rest in there at an angle.
  • - Very simple standard cases. Doesn’t look like much from the outside.
  • - Only 2 bow holders.

Price: starting at $130, weight: 5.7 lb.

Pros

  • - Simple but stylish exterior shells. Made of flax, so it looks like a fabric case.
  • - Very spacious accessory pocket. Can fit shoulder rests of any size.
  • - It is an environmentally friendly case. It can be recycled. Good for the planet.
  • - There’s an option to get the case with a sheet music pouch.

Cons

  • - Not as protective as some of the fiberglass and hard shell cases.
  • - Only 2 bow holders.
  • - Only comes in 2 colors - gray and brown.

 

Which Violin Case Is Right For You?

 

Now that we’ve taken a look at some of the best violin cases we have, which one is right for you?

 

What Qualities Are Most Important To You?

Weight, protection, or durability? If you were working with a budget and you had to choose 2 out of the 3 qualities, which 2 would it be? On the other hand, if you do have the budget you could have all 3 important qualities of a violin case. Now it’s just a matter of style and personal preferences.

 

What Other Considerations Do You Have?

Do you travel a lot? Do you live somewhere humid? Do you have a large shoulder rest? Do you need space for sheet music? Is this case for an elementary school student or a professional orchestral violinist? Is it a gift?

 

Take Our Online Survey

 

If you haven’t had a chance to do so, you can take our online survey, and one of our team members will help you find the case you’re looking for. Take the guesswork out of finding a case!


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